PTE (Pearson Language Tests)

Exam Name PTE
PTE full form Pearson Test of English
Official Website https://pearsonpte.com/
Conducting body Pearson PLC Group
Widely popular as English language proficiency test
Generally accepted by Universities in UK, Australia, and New Zealand
Types of exam PTE Academic and PTE General
Mode of exam   Skills Tested Online   English Speaking, Writing, Listening and Reading

PTE (Pearson Language Tests)

Overview

Pearson Language Tests is a computer-based English language test accepted by educational institutions around the world. Those students and aspirants who desire to go abroad for studying or immigration to a major English speaking country are required to take the PTE Academic exam to prove their English language competency.

The three-hour-long computer-based test focusses on day to day English rather than high-level English language and tests a student on his/her ability to effectively understand the language as spoken daily. The multi-level grading system ensures a better understanding of the student’s proficiency in the English language.

Structure

The Pearson Test of English Academic comprises 3 sections: i) Speaking & Writing ii) Reading and iii) Listening.

Section Duration PTE Academic
Speaking & Writing 77 – 93 minutes Personal IntroductionRead AloudRepeat sentenceDescribe imageRe-tell lectureAnswer short questionSummarize written text (10 min)Essay (20mins)
Reading 32 – 41 minutes Reading and Writing: Fill in the blanksMultiple-choice, choose multiple answersRe-order paragraphsReading: Fill in the blanksMultiple-choice, choose single answerA 10-minute break is optional
Listening 45 – 57 minutes Summarize spoken textMultiple-choice, choose multiple answersFill the blanksHighlight the correct summaryMultiple choices, choose a single answerSelect missing wordHighlight incorrect wordsWrite from dictation

What are the eligibility criteria for the PTE Academic Exam?

As such, there are no specific criteria set by the Pearson PLC Group – the conducting body of the PTE Academic exam. However, according to the PTE Academic eligibility criteria, students must be at least 16 years of age at the time of appearing for the test. Also, candidates who are below 18 years of age need to give a parental consent form for appearing for the PTE Academic test.

Age Limit to Appear for PTE Academic Exam

In order to take the PTE Academic test, the candidate must be at least 16 years old. Candidates below 18 years of age need to take a parental consent form signed by either parents or guardians before taking the test. Candidates can download the consent form from the official website of the PTE Academic Exam. 

Education Qualification to appear for PTE Academic Exam?

Pearson PLC Group – the conducting body of the PTE Academic Exam has not laid down any education qualification criteria for candidates wanting to appear for the PTE Academic test.

Steps to register PTE Academic online

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GMAT

GMAT OVERVIEW

The Graduate Management Admission Test is a computer adaptive test intended to assess certain analytical, writing, quantitative, verbal, and reading skills in written English for use in admission to a graduate management program, such as an MBA program.

Annual number of test takers: More than 200,000 (2019)

Knowledge / skills tested: Quantitative reasoning, verbal reasoning, integrated reasoning, analytical writing

Score / grade validity: 5 Years

Countries / regions: 650 test centers in 114 countries.

Purpose: Admissions in graduate management programs of business schools

Developer / administrator: Graduate Management Admission Council

The GMAT Exam is Computer Adaptive

The Quantitative and Verbal Reasoning sections of the GMAT are computer-adaptive, meaning the difficulty of the test tailors itself in real-time to your ability level. This feature allows the exam to assess your potential with a higher degree of precision and deliver scores that business schools trust.

Here’s how it works: The first question you receive in either the Verbal or Quantitative sections will be of medium difficulty. As you answer each question, the computer scores your answer and uses it as well as your responses to any preceding question to select the next question. If you answer the first question correctly, the computer will usually give you a harder question. If you answer the first question incorrectly, your next question will be easier.  This process continues until you complete the section, using responses to all previously answered questions, at which point the computer will have and accurate assessment of your ability in that subject.

You will not be able to skip, return to, or change your answers to questions. This is because the computer uses your response to each question to select the next one.

GMAT Exam Structure

An Assessment of the Skills That Matter Most in Business

The GMAT Exam Has Four Sections:

  1. Analytical Writing Assessment—measures your ability to think critically and to communicate your ideas
  2. Integrated Reasoning—measures your ability to analyze data and evaluate information presented in multiple formats
  3. Quantitative Reasoning—measures your ability to analyze data and draw conclusions using reasoning skills
  4. Verbal Reasoning—measures your ability to read and understand written material, to evaluate arguments and to correct written material to conform to standard written English

In total the test takes just under 3 1/2 hours to complete, including two optional breaks.

Structure of the GMAT Exam

The GMAT Exam has four separately timed sections. You will have the opportunity to take two optional eight-minute breaks during the exam.

Test Section Time Limit / Number of Questions Question Types Score Range
Analytical Writing Assessment 30 minutes
1 question
Analysis of an Argument 0-6
(in 0.5-point increments)
Integrated Reasoning 30 minutes
12 questions
Graphics Interpretation, Table Analysis, Multi-source Reasoning, Two-part Analysis 1-8
(in 1-point increments)
Quantitative Reasoning 62 minutes
31 questions
Data Sufficiency, Problem Solving 6-51
(in 1-point increments)
Verbal Reasoning 65 minutes
36 questions
Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, Sentence Correction 6-51
(in 1-point increments)

Control Your Test Taking Experience

When you arrive at your test center, you have the flexibility to choose from three options for your exam’s section order:

  1. Analytical Writing Assessment, Integrated Reasoning, Quantitative, Verbal
  2. Verbal, Quantitative, Integrated Reasoning, Analytical Writing Assessment
  3. Quantitative, Verbal, Integrated Reasoning, Analytical Writing Assessment

This choice simply gives you more control and flexibility to take the GMAT exam based on your strengths and testing preferences. 

What is the Eligibility criteria for the GMAT exam?

As such, there is no set eligibility criteria set by GMAC, the body conducting GMAT for appearing for the GMAT exam. However, one should always meet the eligibility criteria set by the university/college one aspires to get into after giving the GMAT.

Age criteria

  • The candidate must have completed 18 years of age
  • There is no upper age limit of the candidate
  • If the candidate is between 13 to 17 years old, they should have permission in writing from their parents or legal guardian

Educational qualification

  • GMAC has not announced any official statement regarding qualification required to appear for GMAT
  • Candidates who wish to enroll for an MBA programme should possess a graduate degree in any discipline from a recognized university

GMAT Exam Fee

The application fee for the GMAT exam is $250, which would translate to INR 17,000 approximately. Also, if the applicants want to change the center or reschedule the test then they will be charged $50 extra.

  • GMAT Cancellation Fee: If you cancel the exam more than 7 days before the test date then you will be refunded US$80. Also, if you cancel within the 7 days of the test date then you will not get any refund. Moreover, the test appointment cannot be canceled within the 24 hours of the scheduled test and time.
  • GMAT Rescheduling Fee: If you reschedule the exam more than 7 days before the test date you have to pay US$60.00 fee. Also, if you reschedule the exam within the 7 days of the test date you have to pay US$250.00 fee. Moreover, the exam cannot be rescheduled within the 24 hours of the scheduled test date and time.

How to Register for GMAT?

According to GMAC, you can register for the GMAT exam 6 months before the Graduate Management Admission Test date or latest by 24 hours before the GMAT exam date, however, the slot is not available at the last moment. Therefore, it is suggested to book your preferred slot well before the planned exam date.

Ways to registers for GMAT:

  • Online
  • Phone
  • Postal mail

There are six steps to register for the GMAT Exam and also different steps to schedule the GMAT exam. You can read the complete steps to register for the GMAT Exam here.

GMAT Exam Dates

There are no fixed official GMAT dates, you can choose any date according to your convenience and availability. In case you need to retake the GMAT exam you can do so after 16 days. You can take or retake the GMAT exam after every 16 days. You can appear for the exam a maximum of five times a year. Ideally, candidates are recommended to register themselves two to three months before the exam date. If you register online or by phone, you can get yourself registered as late as 24 hours before the exam date. But it is safer to stick to early registration as you will then have a set schedule to prepare for the exam accordingly. Even the coaching institutes recommend you to register at the earliest available date so that you have a wide window of time to prepare.

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GRE (Graduate Record Examinations)

Overview

The Graduate Record Examinations is a standardized test that is an admissions requirement for many graduate schools in the United States and Canada. The GRE is owned and administered by Educational Testing Service. The test was established in 1936 by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

Annual number of test takers: 584,677 (2016)

Knowledge / skills tested: Analytical writing, quantitative reasoning and verbal reasoning

Score / grade validity: 5 years

Scores / grades used by: Most graduate schools in USA, and few in other countries

Purpose: Admissions to master’s and doctoral degree programs in various universities

Developer / administrator: Educational Testing Service

Whether you are planning to go to graduate school, including business or law — or just exploring your options — you are taking an important step toward your future. It is a smart move to show schools your best and with the GRE® General Test, you can!

The GRE General Test helps you do your best on test day. With the GRE General Test, you decide which scores to send to schools. If you feel you didn’t do your best on test day, that’s okay. You can retake the test and then send only the scores you want schools to see. It’s all part of the Score Select option, only available with GRE tests.

Plus, the GRE General Test is the only admissions test for graduate and professional school that lets you skip questions within a section, go back and change answers, and have control to tackle the questions within a section you want to answer first.

Structure

The computer-based GRE General Test consists of six sections. The first section is always the analytical writing section involving separately timed issue and argument tasks. The next five sections consist of two verbal reasoning sections, two quantitative reasoning sections, and either an experimental or research section. These five sections may occur in any order. The experimental section does not count towards the final score but is not distinguished from the scored sections. Unlike the computer adaptive test before August 2011, the GRE General Test is a multistage test, where the examinee’s performance on earlier sections determines the difficulty of subsequent sections. This format allows the examined person to freely move back and forth between questions within each section, and the testing software allows the user to “mark” questions within each section for later review if time remains. The entire testing procedure lasts about 3 hours 45 minutes.One-minute breaks are offered after each section and a 10-minute break after the third section.

The paper-based GRE General Test also consists of six sections. The analytical writing is split up into two sections, one section for each issue and argument task. The next four sections consist of two verbal and two quantitative sections in varying order. There is no experimental section on the paper-based test. This version is only available in areas where the computer-based version is unavailable.

  • Verbal Reasoning — Measures the ability to analyze and draw conclusions from discourse, reason from incomplete data, understand multiple levels of meaning, such as literal, figurative and author’s intent, summarize text, distinguish major from minor points, understand the meanings of words, sentences and entire texts, and understand relationships among words and among concepts. There is an emphasis on complex verbal reasoning skills.
  • Quantitative Reasoning — Measures the ability to understand, interpret and analyze quantitative information, solve problems using mathematical models, and apply the basic concepts of arithmetic, algebra, geometry and data analysis. There is an emphasis on quantitative reasoning skills.
  • Analytical Writing — Measures critical thinking and analytical writing skills, including the ability to articulate and support complex ideas with relevant reasons and examples, and examine claims and accompanying evidence. There is an emphasis on analytical writing skills.

Issue Task

The test taker is given 30 minutes to write an essay about a selected topic.Issue topics are selected from a pool of questions, which the GRE Program has published in its entirety. Individuals preparing for the GRE may access the pool of tasks on the ETS website.

Argument Task

The test taker will be given an argument (i.e. a series of facts and considerations leading to a conclusion) and asked to write an essay that critiques the argument. Test takers are asked to consider the argument’s logic and to make suggestions about how to improve the logic of the argument. Test takers are expected to address the logical flaws of the argument and not provide a personal opinion on the subject. The time allotted for this essay is 30 minutes. The Arguments are selected from a pool of topics, which the GRE Program has published in its entirety. Individuals preparing for the GRE may access the pool of tasks on the ETS website.

Experimental section

The experimental section, which can be either verbal or quantitative, contains new questions ETS is considering for future use. Although the experimental section does not count towards the test-taker’s score, it is unidentified and appears identical to the scored sections. Because test takers have no definite way of knowing which section is experimental, it is typically advised that test takers try their best and be focused on every section. Sometimes an identified research section at the end of the test is given instead of the experimental section. There is no experimental section on the paper-based GRE.

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ACT

Overview

The ACT is a standardized test used for college admissions in the United States. It is currently administered by ACT, a nonprofit organization of the same name. The ACT test covers four academic skill areas: English, mathematics, reading, and science reasoning. It also offers an optional direct writing test.

Knowledge / skills tested: English, math, reading, science, writing (optional)

Annual number of test takers: Over 1.91 million high school graduates in the class of 2018

Scores / grades used by: Colleges or universities offering undergraduate programs (mostly in the US and Canada)

Year started: 1959

Purpose: Undergraduate admissions (mostly in the US and Canadian universities or colleges)

Offered: US and Canada: 7 times a year. Other countries: 5 times a year.

Introduction

The purpose of the ACT test is to measure a high school student’s readiness for college, and provide colleges with one common data point that can be used to compare all applicants. College admissions officers will review standardized test scores alongside your high school GPA, the classes you took in high school, letters of recommendation from teachers or mentors, extracurricular activities, admissions interviews, and personal essays. How important ACT scores are in the college application process varies from school to school.

Overall, the higher you score on the ACT and/or SAT, the more options for attending and paying for college will be available to you.

When should I take the ACT?

Most high school students take the ACT, SAT, or both during the spring of their junior year or fall of their senior year. It’s important to leave time to re-take the test if you need to raise your score before you apply to college. The ACT exam is offered nationally every year in September, October, December, February, April, June, and July. 

What is on the ACT?

There are four ACT sections:

  • English
  • Reading
  • Math
  • Science

 

Averages

 

Section Number of questions Time (minutes) Score Range Average score (2018) College Readiness Benchmark Content
English 75 45 1–36 20.2 18 Usage/mechanics and rhetorical skills
Mathematics 60 60 1–36 20.5 22 Pre-algebra, elementary algebra, intermediate algebra, coordinate geometry, geometry, elementary trigonometry, reasoning, and problem-solving
Reading 40 35 1–36 21.3 22 Reading comprehension
Science 40 35 1–36 20.7 23 Interpretation, analysis, evaluation, reasoning, and problem-solving
Optional Writing Test (not included in composite score) 1 essay prompt 40 1–12 6.5 Writing skills
Composite 1–36 20.8 Average (mean) of all section scores except Writing

How long is the ACT?

The ACT is 2 hours and 55 minutes long. If you choose to take the ACT with Essay, the test will be 3 hours and 35 minutes long.

How is the ACT scored?

Each section of the ACT is scored on a 1 to 36 point scale. Your composite ACT score is the average of your four section scores, also on a scale from 1 to 36. If you take the ACT with Writing Test, you will receive a separate score on the Writing Test.

Should I take the ACT or the SAT?

Most colleges and universities will accept scores from either the SAT or ACT, and do not favor one test over the other. That said, college-bound students are increasingly taking both the SAT and ACT. Changes made to the SAT in 2016 have made it easier than ever to prep for both tests concurrently—and earn competitive scores on both! The best way to decide if taking the SAT, ACT, or both tests is right for you is to take a timed full-length practice test of each type. Since the content and style of the SAT and ACT are very similar, factors like how you handle time pressure and what types of questions you find most challenging can help you determine which test is a better fit. Try our QUIZ: SAT, ACT, or Both?

How do I register for the ACT?

Registration deadlines fall approximately five weeks before each ACT test date. You can get registration materials from your school counselor, or you can register online on the ACT website.

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SAT

SAT Overview:

The SAT is a standardized test widely used for college admissions in the United States. Since it was debuted by the College Board in 1926, its name and scoring have changed several times; originally called the Scholastic Aptitude Test, it was later called the Scholastic Assessment Test.

Scores / grades used byMost universities and colleges offering undergraduate programs in the U.S.

Knowledge / skills testedWriting, critical reading, mathematics

Annual number of test takersOver 2.22 million high school graduates in the class of 2019

Developer / administratorCollege Board, Educational Testing Service

PurposeAdmission to undergraduate programs of universities or colleges

Offered7 times annually

SAT content and format

The SAT tests skills that you are learning in high school—skills you’re likely to need in college and beyond. Here are some of the content areas and question formats you can expect to see on the SAT:

Words in context

You will be tested on words that appear frequently in high-school-level and college-level texts.

Command of evidence

The evidence-based reading and writing section of the SAT will ask you to analyze, synthesize, and interpret data from a wide range of sources. These sources include informational graphics—such as tables, charts, and graphs—as well as multi-paragraph passages in the following areas: literature and literary nonfiction; the humanities; science; history and social studies; work and career.

For every passage or pair of passages you’ll see during the Reading Test, at least one question will ask you to identify which part of the text best supports the answer to the previous question. In other instances, you’ll be asked to find the best answer to a question by pulling together information conveyed in words and graphics.

The Writing and Language Test also focuses on command of evidence. It will ask you to analyze a series of sentences or paragraphs and decide if they make sense. Other questions will ask you to interpret graphics and to edit a part of the accompanying passage so that it clearly and accurately communicates the information in the graphics.

The SAT essay also tests your command of evidence. After reading a passage, you’ll be asked to determine how the author builds an argument to persuade an audience through the use of evidence, reasoning, or stylistic and persuasive devices.

Essay analyzing a source

The SAT essay is optional—it asks you to analyze how an author uses evidence, reasoning, and other stylistic evidence to craft a persuasive argument.

The Math that matters most

The Math Test focuses in depth on three essential areas of math: Problem Solving and Data AnalysisHeart of Algebra, and Passport to Advanced Math.

  • Questions from the Problem Solving and Data Analysis area will require you to use ratios, percentages, and proportional reasoning to solve problems in science, social science, and career contexts.
  • Questions from the Heart of Algebra area focus on the mastery of linear equations and systems, which help students develop key powers of abstraction.
  • The Passport to Advanced Math questions focus on more complex equations and the manipulation they require.

Problems grounded in real-world contexts

Throughout the SAT—in the Math Test, the Reading Test, and the Writing and Language Test—you will be asked questions grounded in the real world, directly related to work performed in college and career.

Analysis in science and analysis in history/social studies

You will be asked to apply your knowledge in reading, writing, language, and math to answer questions in science and history/social studies contexts. Questions will require you to read and understand texts and to synthesize information presented through texts and graphics.

Founding documents and great global conversations.

These reading passages focus on major founding political documents and the great global conversations they inspire.

Length of the SAT

The SAT is three hours long test. The optional Essay is an additional 50 minutes.

Section Breakdown

Here are the main components of the SAT:

Reading Test – 65 minutes, 52 questions

Writing and Language Test – 35 minutes, 44 questions

Math Test – two sections:
1) No calculator – 25 minutes, 20 questions
2) Calculator permitted – 55 minutes, 38 questions

Optional essay section (50 minutes)

Scoring

The SAT is scored on a 400 to 1600 scale. You will also receive subscore reporting for every test—math, reading, and writing and language—plus additional subscores to provide added insight into your test performance.

No penalty for guessing

No points are deducted for wrong answers, so don’t leave anything blank!

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TOEFL

Overview

Annual number of test takers: 2.3 million per year

Knowledge / skills tested: Reading, listening, speaking and writing of the English language

Score / grade validity: 2 years

Scores / grades used by: More than 10,000 colleges, agencies and other institutions in over 130 countries.

Countries / regions: 4,500 test centers in 165 countries.

Prerequisites / eligibility criteria: No official prerequisite. Intended for non-native English speakers

TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) is a standardized test to measure the English language ability of non-native speakers wishing to enroll in English-speaking universities. The test is accepted by many English-speaking academic and professional institutions

Internet-based test

Since its introduction in late 2005, the TOEFL Internet-based Test (IBT) format has progressively replaced the computer-based tests (CBT) and paper-based tests (PBT), although paper-based testing is still used in select areas. The TOEFL IBT test has been introduced in phases, with the United States, Canada, France, Germany, and Italy in 2005 and the rest of the world in 2006, with test centers added regularly. The CBT was discontinued in September 2006 and these scores are no longer valid.

Initially, the demand for test seats was higher than availability, and candidates had to wait for months. It is now possible to take the test within one to four weeks in most countries. The four-hour test consists of four sections, each measuring one of the basic language skills (while some tasks require integrating multiple skills), and all tasks focus on language used in an academic, higher-education environment. Note-taking is allowed during the TOEFL IBT test. The test cannot be taken more than once every 3 days, starting from September 2019.

  1. Reading

The Reading section consists of questions on 3-4 passages, each approximately 700 words in length and with 10 questions. The passages are on academic topics; they are the kind of material that might be found in an undergraduate university textbook. Passages require understanding of rhetorical functions such as cause-effect, compare-contrast and argumentation. Students answer questions about main ideas, details, inferences, essential information, sentence insertion, vocabulary, rhetorical purpose and overall ideas. New types of questions in the TOEFL IBT test require filling out tables or completing summaries. Prior knowledge of the subject under discussion is not necessary to come to the correct answer.

  • Listening

The Listening section consists of questions on 2-3 conversations with 5 questions each, and 5-7 lectures with 6 questions each. Each conversation is 2.5-3 minutes and lectures are 4.5-5.5 minutes in length. The conversations involve a student and either a professor or a campus service provider. The lectures are a self-contained portion of an academic lecture, which may involve student participation and does not assume specialized background knowledge in the subject area. Each conversation and lecture passage is heard only once. Test-takers may take notes while they listen and they may refer to their notes when they answer the questions. The listening questions are meant to measure the ability to understand main ideas, important details, implications, relationships between ideas, organization of information, speaker purpose and speaker attitude.

  • Speaking

The Speaking section consists of 4 tasks: 1 independent (Task 1) and 3 integrated (Task 2, 3, 4). In task 1, test-takers answer opinion questions on familiar topics. They are evaluated on their ability to speak spontaneously and convey their ideas clearly and coherently. In task 2 and 4, test-takers read a short passage, listen to an academic course lecture or a conversation about campus life and answer a question by combining appropriate information from the text and the talk. In task 3, test-takers listen to an academic course lecture and then respond to a question about what they heard. In the integrated tasks, test-takers are evaluated on their ability to appropriately synthesize and effectively convey information from the reading and listening material. Test-takers may take notes as they read and listen and may use their notes to help prepare their responses. Test-takers are given a short preparation time before they have to begin speaking. The responses are digitally recorded, sent to ETS’s Online Scoring Network (OSN), and evaluated by three to six raters.

  • Writing

The Writing section measures a test taker’s ability to write in an academic setting and consists of two tasks: one integrated and one independent. In the integrated task, test-takers read a passage on an academic topic and then listen to a speaker discuss it. The test-taker then writes a summary about the important points in the listening passage and explains how these relate to the key points of the reading passage. In the independent task, the test-taker must write an essay that states their opinion or choice, and then explain it, rather than simply listing personal preferences or choices. Responses are sent to the ETS OSN and evaluated by at least 3 different raters.

Task Description Approximate time
Reading 3-4 passages, each containing 10 questions 54-72 minutes
Listening 5-7 passages, each containing 5–6 questions 41-57 minutes
Break Mandatory break 10 minutes
Speaking 4 tasks 17 minutes
Writing 2 tasks 50 minutes
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IELTS

IELTS Overview:
Full Form: The International English Language Testing System (IELTS)
Year Started: 1980 AD
Score / Grade Range: 0 to 9 at increment of 0.5 band multiple.
Test Score/Grade Validity: 2 Years
Total Test Duration: 2 hours 45 minutes.
Annual number of test takers: Over 3 million per year.
Test official authorities: British Council and IDP
Countries / Regions: More than 1,200 test centers in over 140 countries.
Official Websites: www.ielts.org

How many types of IELTS tests are there?

There are two types of IELTS Test namely:

  1. IELTS Academic
  2. IELTS General Training.

IELTS test is mainly of two types: Academic and General Training. The Test consists of Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing.

In both tests Listening & speaking are same whereas there is a slight variation on Reading and Writing for Academic and General Training IELTS Test according to 2018 Exam pattern.

Introduction to IELTS

IELTS stands for International English Language Testing System. Initially started in the Year 1980 AD officially, there are more than 1,200 test centers in over 140 countries.
IELTS test scores are validated by thousands of Academic institutions (Universities & Colleges) and workplaces as an Expertise in English Proficiency.
The IELTS test is currently hosted by British Council and IDP in Nepal and around the globe.
The Test scores do not denote pass or fail straightly. Every institution and offices have different requirements for IELTS score. The test compares the ability of the English Language over 4 base areas: Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking. Each skill has their individual scores and a final overall score calculated between 0 to 9, with 0 being the lowest and 9 being the highest.

What does Each Score/scale denote in IELTS test result?

Band 9: Expert User:
Band 8 Very good User:
Band 7 Good User:
Band 6 Competent User:
Band 5 Modest User:
Band 4 Limited User:
Band 3 Extremely limited User:
Band 2 Intermittent User:
Band 1 Non User:
Band 0 Did not attempt the test

Structure of IELTS Test

Listening

In this test, you have to listen to a sample piece of text that is played to you and you have to attend 40 questions related to the text. You have 1 hour to complete the whole test.

Reading

This portion of the test requires you to read 3 pieces which are provided to you. Each piece is allowed 20 minutes each.

Writing

This portion of the test is divided into two parts each:
150 words
The short portion requires you to describe a diagram or a pie chart or any similar visual chart in about 150 words. The examiner sees how good you clearly can you explain the diagram.
200 words
For the long portion, you are provided a situation and you are required to give your opinion on the situation. The examiner sees how well you can use the English language to describe your views and opinions.

Speaking

Speaking test is taken separately which may last for 10 minutes to half an hour depending on the test conductor. The examiner sees how fluent your English is and if you can/cannot communicate in English with ease.

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